Eye Health

Eye Health

For a sort explanation of the following eye helath issues click on the links below, you will also find links to further information about each of these.

Eye Anatomy

The most common form of vision loss worldwide. It is an opacification or clouding of the lens resulting in vision that is no longer sharp. This is normally associated with the ageing process, but can be congenital. Environmental factors such as the UV, medication and general health can affect the progression and severity of the cataracts.

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Cataracts

Cataracts

The most common form of vision loss worldwide. It is an opacification or clouding of the lens resulting in vision that is no longer sharp. This is normally associated with the ageing process, but can be congenital. Environmental factors such as the UV, medication and general health can affect the progression and severity of the cataracts.

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Glaucoma

Macular Degeneration

Cataracts

“Macular Degeneration (MD) is the name given to a group of degenerative diseases of the retina that cause progressive, painless loss of central vision, affecting the ability to see fine detail, drive, read and recognise faces.  Although there is no cure for MD, there are treatment options that can slow down its progression, depending on the stage and type of the disease (wet, dry, and other forms). The earlier the disease is detected, the more vision you are likely to retain.” (Source: MD Foundation)

http://www.provision.com.au/index.php?sectionID=9546&pageID=9397 http://www.mdfoundation.com.au/

Diabetes

Diabetes

A common systemic problem within Australia, Diabetes affects more than one million Australians. Diabetes can damage the fine blood vessels in the retina and lead to an eye disease known as diabetic retinopathy. If left undetected and untreated, this can cause serious eye damage including blurred vision and even blindness. (Source: Provision Website)

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Pterigiums

Diabetes

Pterygiums (pronounced te-ri-gi-ums) are very common particularly in Australia. It is a growth on the front of the eye (cornea), which appears as a swelling, or thickening that spreads towards the centre of the eye. Factors such has high UV exposure, heat, and dusty environments are usually associated with this condition.

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Long-Sighted

Diabetes

Hyperopia (Long-Sighted) is a refractive error where light is focused behind the retina. The eye is either too short or the lens power to weak for the length of the eye.

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Short-Sighted

Diabetes

Myopia (Short-sighted) is the opposite of hyperopia and often called near sightedness. Light is focused in front of the retina because the optical system is too strong or the eye is too long.

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Astigmatism

Diabetes

Astigmatism is a splitting of light rays resulting in improper focus on the retina. This is caused by irregularities in the surface of the cornea or in the lens. That is, the front of the eye looks more like an “oval egg or rugby ball” shape, as compared to a round spherical shape.

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Keratoconus

Diabetes

Is a degenerative disorder in which the front surface of the eye (Cornea), weakens structurally with resulting thinning. This leads to the cornea becoming conical in shape with ensuing distortion of vision. This initially can be corrected with glasses and hard contact lenses, but sometimes requires surgical intervention with corneal grafts.

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